FAQ

Where did the "Run.Hide.Fight." concept originate?

- "Run.Hide.Fight" is a nationally recognized protocol for active shooter response that is widely used by universities and other workplaces accross the country. Though it's originally created by the Department of Homeland Security and the city of Houston, Texas.

What is an active shooter?

- An individual whose activity is immediately causing death and serious injury who is using a weapon and is not contained. The weapon is usually a gun but could be a knife, other blunt object, or other threatening weapon.

Why is learning about active shooter response important?

- Even though this is a difficult subject, talking to your friends about active shooter preparedness and what they would do, in response to the active shooter, can have a life-saving impact. As men and woman for others, it is the community's responsibility to do what ever it can to keep community members and others safe and prepared, and to be sure that everyone is familiar with the Run.Hide.Fight. safety program.

How do I go about getting the Run.Hide.Fight training?

- On the navigation bar located on the left, click "Course Request for Run.Hide.Fight. training" to schedule a group class, or click here. The training takes only 30 minutes and is presented by university police officers and emergency management personnel.

Who will respond to an active shooter situation on the Georgetown campus?

- On the main, law and medical campuses, both the Georgetown University Police Department and the Metropolitcan Police Department will respond.

- At the School of Continuing Studies the Metropolitan Police Department will respond.

How can I contribute to community safety efforts on campus?

- Sign up for the 30 minute Run.Hide.Fight. training course. Talk to your friends about the importance of taking the Run.Hide.Fight. training.

- Download the LiveSafe app and make use of the SafeRides feature, and send tips about suspicious situations directly to GUPD using the tip form..

- Familiarize yourself with the university's Threat Assessment Program.